POLICY AND PLANNING

In 2012, Inclusive Cities launched the Informal Economy Monitoring Study (IEMS) -- a major study of the urban informal economy being undertaken in 10 cities around the world: The study combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to provide an in-depth understanding of how three groups of urban informal workers – home-based workers, street vendors, and waste pickers – are affected by and respond to economic trends, urban policies and practices, value chain dynamics, and other economic and social forces. This short video highlights some of the study's results.

Watch Informal Economy Monitoring Study Video

More Results from the Informal Economy Monitoring Study

RESEARCH 

Statistics on the Informal Economy: Definitions, Regional Estimates and Challenges.

There is renewed interest in the informal economy worldwide. In part, the renewed interest stems from the fact that, contrary to predictions, the informal economy has not only persisted but has also emerged in new forms and in unexpected places. Moreover many now recognize that the informal economy is integrally linked to the formal economy and contributes to the overall economy. There is also growing recognition that supporting the working poor in the informal economy is a key pathway to reducing poverty and inequality. In particular, since women tend to be concentrated in the more precarious forms of informal employment, supporting working poor women in the informal economy is a key pathway to reducing women’s poverty and gender inequality.

Statistics on the Informal Economy: Definitions, Regional Estimates and Challenges

More on Global Research in the Informal Sector 

Latest Tweets

Inclusive Cities Blog

Find Us on Facebook